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Aim at heaven and you will get earth thrown in. Aim at earth and you get neither. (C.S. Lewis)

Childhood is a special time, when the world is filled with an endless array of possibilities; the only separation that exists between the inquisitive mind of the child child and the dreams they create is the inner need they have to mold the world to their inner most callings.

However, childhood and adolescence can also be a trying time. Children must learn to work with their emotions, find and hone their personal strengths, and take action, despite personal fears and issues of self-doubt that may arise. They take all of this on, and much, much more, so that they can identify, plan, and implement a path to dream their life forward.

Each and everyone of us faced a number of emotional toils during childhood and adolescence. As adults, we oftentimes have suppressed or repressed these emotional toils in order to get on with our lives. Adults, oftentimes forget the emotional journey they underwent to “grow up,” and that is the reason many parents simply don’t understand the journey their children undertake to “grow up.”While the emotions of childhood are intense, their emotional and psychological growth is dependent on their capacity to learn and their parent’s capacity to effectively teach ways to handle emotionally charged situations.

Common problems seen during childhood include self doubt, self-esteem, difficulties relating to others, and difficulties with social expectations. Multiple problems can arise in the way children and adolescents learn to adapt and overcome the barriers personal, parental, and social expectations can place on their developing psyche.

In working with children, it is imperative to help them identify their path, while amplifying their strengths to help overcome and / or redirect their weaknesses. Children must choose their own path, and be exposed to an environment that will foster their dreams to become reality.

In Childhood and adolescent therapy, we help your child to make sense of their emotional world. Unlike adult therapy, where the problems are often self-oriented, with children, their stress is both internal and related to the external environment they must incur. This is why childhood therapy must include a family orientation. Your children cannot be treated outside the context of the environment in which they develop. By helping them to become aware of their emotions, identifying the areas of strength they have, and helping the environment to work in a manner that amplifies those strengths, versus having predetermined expectations, your child’s emotional and psychological development will begin to flourish, as they learn ever more complex ways to handle emotionally distressing events.

At the Stockton Therapy Network, we specialize in helping children overcome their emotional difficulties. We give them a helping hand, exploring, reframing, and moving on from the emotional trauma’s that afflict them. We understand childhood and adolescent development, and have years of experience working with children who have mild to severe emotional problems. By helping a child to work with their emotional state, the door opens to new opportunities, as they learn  ways to re-engage the dreamlike states of reverie that no child should loose. We help children to identify, plan, and engage their dreams, so that one-day what was once only a dream, will become aspects of the reality they created.

Child and Adolescent Counseling, psychotherapy, Stockton California

“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.” (Albert Einstein)

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